Assessment of childhood cancer at National Oncology Center in Sana`a city, Yemen

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Abdulsalam Mohammed Dallak1, Nabil Ahmed Al-Rabeei2, Ashwaq A. Al-Ariki3

Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sana’a University1,2, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al-Hudaydah University 3

Introduction:

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells[1]. According to World Health Organization (WHO) the childhood cancer is becoming an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide [2]. Cancer is next to injury, the second most common cause of childhood death in developed countries [3,4]. Cancer may affect people at all ages, even fetuses, but risk for the more common varieties tends to increase with age. Incidence rates are highest among infants, decline until age 9, and then rise again with increasing age [5]. In all age groups, the incidence is significantly higher in boys than in girls; boys have an overall 20-25% excess risk for cancer mainly to a greater risk of lymphomas, leukemias and central nervous system (CNS) tumors [3]. A study conducted by

Bawazir, et al. [6] to study prevalence of cancer in Aden governorate and adjacent governorates through the information registered in the registry for treatment aboard of the Aden health offices (1989-1993). Out of 685 cases of cancer, 69 (10.1%) were children aged 0-19 years. The distribution of childhood cancer by sex were 43 (62.3%) in males and 26 (37.7%) in females. The absence of a national cancer registry means there is a lack of reliable data for evaluating the real situation of childhood cancer in Yemen. There was no national survey in Yemen to estimate incidence of childhood cancer. Despite the rising importance of this disease, there is a lack of studies which characterize the incidence or distribution of different types of childhood cancer in Yemen. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first study was done to assess

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